Library Moments: April Online Book Club

the waste landErin Kernohan-Berning, Branch Services Librarian: Hello, I’m Erin Kernohan-Berning from the Haliburton County Public Library and this is Library Moments. Once a week some of us from the library will come and talk about books, upcoming events, or the services we offer at the library.

In 1996, the Academy of American Poets stood on the steps of a New York City post office handing out T.S. Elliot’s poem The Waste Land to people waiting to mail off their tax returns. The poem begins, “April is the cruelest month…” and there, April as National Poetry Month was born. Or so the story goes. National Poetry Month is now celebrated in both the United States and Canada, and is meant to celebrate poetry and it’s important place in our culture.

There are many great collections of poetry available at the Haliburton County Public Library, but for our April online book club we decided, in a twist on poetry month, to look at novels written by poets. So today, Sherrill Sherwood and I will each talk about a book written by a poet.

the bell jar.jpgSherrill Sherwood, Collection Development Coordinator: The Bell Jar, Sylvia Plath’s only novel, was originally published in 1963 under the pseudonym Victoria Lucas. The novel is partially based on Plath’s own life and has become a modern classic. Celebrated for its darkly funny and razor sharp portrait of 1950s society, millions of copies have been sold worldwide. The story is about Esther Greenwood winning an internship on a New York fashion magazine in 1953. She is elated, believing she will finally realize her dream to become a writer. But in between the cocktail parties and piles of manuscripts, Esther’s life begins to slide out of control. She finds herself spiraling into depression and eventually attempts suicide, as she grapples with difficult relationships and a society which refuses to take women’s aspirations seriously. As well as The Bell Jar, Haliburton County Public Library’s collection includes The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath: 1950 – 1962 plus the movie Sylvia starring Gwyneth Paltrow, celebrated for her portrayal of Plath.

the nightingale won't let you sleepErin Kernohan-Berning, Branch Services Librarian: In The Nightingale Won’t Let You Sleep by Steven Heighton, Elias Triffanis – a Greek-Canadian – joins the military to appease his dying father. After a traumatic incident in Afghanistan, Elias is shipped to a facility in Paphos, Cyprus to receive treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder – but also to keep him away from public scrutiny. A trip to the coast to visit relatives, a hook up in a bar, and a roll in the sand on a dark beach interrupted by punchy Turkish soliders result in Elias making a quick escape under a barbed wire fence into the abandoned city of Varosha – which is a real city, abandoned in 1974 during a coup that saw Cyprus ever since split between Greece and Turkey with Varosha frozen in time between them. But in the novel there are people living secretly in Varosha, living off the abandoned goods that still survive, under the occasional glance of Turkish Colonel Erkan Kaya – and Elias’ presence there is upsetting a delicate balance. In what has been dubbed a literary thriller, secrets and intrigue unfold among the ruins of Varosha. The Nightingale Won’t Let You Sleep has received mixed reviews, and it seems both the positive and the negative are owing to Heighton’s prowess as a well-decorated award winning poet and how that has influenced his writing in this novel. When I see mixed reviews, I often want to then read the book, just to see what is in it that has polarized readers so much.

Anyone can participate in Haliburton County Public Library’s Online Book Club by choosing to read one or more of four books selected each month. You don’t even have to read from a particular month’s selection you can just go online and make comments about books and reading in general. Just go to haliburtonlibrary.ca and click on the “g” for Goodreads.

That’s it for this week’s Library Moments. Thanks for listening here on 100.9 CANOE FM.

*Originally aired on 100.9 CANOE FM.

Library Moments: February Online Book Club

Nancy Therrien, Programming and Outreach Coordinator: Hello, I’m Nancy Therrien from the Haliburton County Public Library and this is Library Moments. Once a week some of us from the library will come and talk about books, upcoming events, or the services we offer at the library.

Today on Library Moments, Sherrill Sherwood and I will each talk about a banned book that was featured in our February Online Book Club. The Haliburton County Public Library’s online book club is theme-based, meaning that instead of everyone reading the same title, we read different books based on a monthly theme and then let each other know our opinions. The advantage of this is that if a title is unavailable or you have read it in the past, you can pick another book to read. We chose banned books as the topic for this month’s online bookclub because Canada’s Freedom to Read week starts on February 26th.

Sherrill Sherwood, Collection Development Coordinator: I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings is an autobiography of Maya Angelou. It begins when Maya is a small child in the 1930’s South and ends with her high school graduation and the birth of her son. As young children of divorced parents, Maya and her brother are moved to their grandmother’s home in rural Arkansas. Maya sees herself as an ugly unwanted child. She and her brother experience a deep-seated racism first hand, and live in fear of lynch mobs. At the age of 8 Maya and her brother are moved again, this time to live with their mother. Her mother’s live in boyfriend, Mr. Freeman, molests and then finally rapes Maya. They go to court and shortly afterwards, Mr. Freeman is violently murdered. Maya becomes mute. She believes that both the sexual assault and the murder of Mr. Freeman are her fault. She essentially believes she has become a mouthpiece for the devil.

After Maya and her brother are returned to their grandmother, Maya slowly regains her voice – with the help of a kind educated woman named Bertha Flowers. Later, she and her brother are moved again – this time to California. She spends a summer with her father and after her father’s girlfriend cuts her in a fight, she runs away. She lives for a month in a junkyard with a group of homeless teenagers. She returns to her mother in San Francisco and at the age of 15 becomes the city’s first black streetcar conductor. By sixteen, she is pregnant. She hides her pregnancy for 8 months in order to graduate high school. The book ends with her growing confidence as a mother. I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings was nominated for a National Book Award in 1970 and remained on The New York Times paperback bestseller list for two years. It has been used in educational settings from high schools to universities, and the book has been celebrated for creating new literary avenues for the American memoir. However, the book’s graphic depiction of childhood rape, racism, and sexuality has caused it to be challenged or banned in some schools and libraries.

Nancy: One of this month’s titles is Fifty Shades of Grey by E.L. James, the first book in his trilogy. It received a lot of controversy when it came out due to its erotic content involving bondage, domination, and submission, yet it quickly became a New York Times bestseller, with the trilogy selling over 125 million copies worldwide. The story is about a naive young lady named Anastasia who meets a rich, powerful, and exceedingly handsome entrepreneur named Christian Grey. He leads her into the taboo world of BDSM. Their sexual encounters are steaming hot, and are explicitly detailed, so this book is not for the faint-of-heart. Do Christian and Anastasia find lasting true love? You may have to immediately pick up the sequel to find out more. If you have already read and loved the Fifty Shades trilogy and want more of the same, try books written by Maya Banks or Sylvia Day. By the way, the book Fifty Shades of Grey is far superior to its movie adaptation and it is available at the HCPL!

Anyone can participate in Haliburton County Public Library’s Online Book Club by choosing to read one or more of four books selected each month. You don’t even have to read from a particular month’s selection you can just go online and make comments about books and reading in general. Just go to haliburtonlibrary.ca and click on the “g” for Goodreads.

That’s it for this week’s Library Moments. Thanks for listening here on 100.9 CANOE FM.

*Originally aired on 100.9 CANOE FM.

Library Moments: January Online Book Club

Erin Kernohan-Berning, Branch Services Librarian: Hello, I’m Erin Kernohan-Berning from the Haliburton County Public Library and this is Library Moments. Once a week some of us from the library will come and talk about books, upcoming events, or the services we offer at the library.

Not quite as long as a novel, but too long to be a short story, the novella was the subject of our January online book club. There are different accepted word counts for a novella – anywhere from 7,500 words at the top end of what might be considered a short story to just beyond 40,000 words before the story starts to venture into novel territory. While many stories regarded as classics are considered novellas – Charles Dicken’s A Christmas Carol, George Orwell’s Animal Farm, Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange, and The War of the Words by H.G. Wells among them – the modern novella has been more difficult to get published than its lengthier kin. However, there has been a resurgence in popularity for the novella in recent years with Ian McEwan – in The New Yorker – calling the novella the beautiful child of a rambling, ill-shaven giant.

Today on Library Moments, Sherrill Sherwood and I will each talk about a modern novella that was featured in our January Online Book Club.

Sherrill Sherwood, Collections Development: A New York Times bestseller, The Ancient Minstrel is a stunning collection of novellas that highlight Jim Harrison’s phenomenal range as a writer, shot through with his trademark wit and keen insight into the human condition. Harrison has tremendous fun with his own reputation in the title novella The Ancient Minstrel, about an aging writer in Montana who indulges his lifelong dream of raising pigs, struggles to write the ‘big novel’ he’s rashly promised his editor, and attempts to rekindle the long marriage that has sustained him. In the story Eggs, a Montana woman recalls a life spent collecting eggs – at her grandparents’ farm in Montana and near Dorset, England, where she ends up during World War II. Eggs of a different sort preoccupy her when, unmarried but undeterred, she decides to try to have a baby. And in The Case of the Howling Buddhas, retired Detective Sunderson is hired as a private investigator to look into a bizarre cult that achieves enlightenment by howling along with howler monkeys at the zoo. Fresh and entertaining, with moments of both profound wisdom and uplifting humor, The Ancient Minstrel is an exceptional reminder of why Harrison is adored by both readers and critics.

Erin Kernohan-Berning, Branch Services Librarian: The novella seems well suited to the trend of inserting new stories into long standing series, and author Kathy Reichs uses this in her Temperence Brennan series with her novella collection The Bone Collection. The Bone Collection features 4 stand alone novellas that fit within the overall series including the prequel to her first book Déjà Dead titled First Bones which sees Temperance Brennan’s first gig as a forensic anthropologist. Her novellas Bones in her Pocket, Swamp Bones and Bones on Ice all fit between books 15 through 18 of the series, with Bones in her Pocket as book 15.5, Swamp Bones as book 16.5, and Bones on Ice as book 17.5. These half editions can allow authors some room to explore characters or the events between books, and sometimes add some retroactive continuity to existing series lore to better set up a subsequent book. Sometimes they simply serve as a conduit for new readers to experience a long standing series by giving them a stand alone story without having to commit to starting at book 1.

Reading a novella is a different experience than reading a novel. When done well, the structure of the novella demands that a writer polish and tighten up their writing to fit a fully developed story into a shorter format – with no room to stray from the path or explore blind alleys. Now with ebooks and self-publishing disrupting the traditional publishing industry, novellas are becoming easier to find and enjoy. And with this new-found commercial success, they are also becoming easier to find in print and audio formats.

Anyone can participate in Haliburton County Public Library’s Online Book Club by choosing to read one or more of four books selected each month. You don’t even have to read from a particular month’s selection you can just go online and make comments about books and reading in general. Just go to haliburtonlibrary.ca and click on the “g” for Goodreads.

That’s it for this week’s Library Moments. Thanks for listening here on 100.9 CANOE FM.

*Originally aired on 100.9 CANOE FM.

Library Moments: December Online Book Club

Erin Kernohan-Berning, Branch Services Librarian: Hello, I’m Erin Kernohan-Berning from the Haliburton County Public Library and this is Library Moments. Once a week some of us from the library will come and talk about books, upcoming events, or the services we offer at the library.

Around this time of year we start polling our staff for what their favourite book of the year was. Sometimes it’s easy to pick, sometimes not so much. For our December Online Book Club we decided to pick some of our favourite books read in 2016.

Today on Library Moments, Bessie Sullivan and I will talk about our picks for the December Online Book Club.

Bessie Sullivan, County Librarian: One of my favourite reads from 2016 was Helen Simonson’s second novel The Summer Before the War. It’s the summer of 1914 and life in the sleepy village of Rye, England is about to take an interesting turn. Agatha Kent, a force for progress, is expecting an unusual candidate to be the school’s Latin teacher: Beatrice Nash, a woman has never taught Latin at this school before. Agatha’s nephews, meanwhile, have come to spend the summer months, as always, both with dreams of their own: Daniel, the poet, to publish a literary journal in Paris, and Hugh, to graduate from medical studies and marry his surgeon’s daughter thus inheriting a lucrative practice. But then Hugh is sent to pick up Beatrice from the train station and life, of course, changes.

Not only does life change for Hugh and Beatrice, but the First World War is about to become a reality forever altering the hopes and dreams of many young people of that generation. Told with unflinching matter-of-factness, we know that as bad as things are, they are about to get a whole lot worse. What struck me about this book was the exquisite development of characters. By the end of the story I felt I knew them all. Reviewers of the book claim that the Village of Rye can be viewed as a character in the book, I would argue that it is the collection of people who live there that make the village stand out rather than the village as a setting, not so unlike our own communities here in Haliburton County.

Erin: In Malignant Metaphor, author Alanna Mitchell tackles the unhealthy language we use when we talk about cancer. She looks at the societal attitudes around cancer – an irreconcilable trifecta of being simultaneously inevitable, preventable, and deserved. When someone gets cancer, it is viewed as a commentary lifestyle choices or moral compass – Were they eating enough organic fruits and vegetables? Were they exercising enough? Were they holding in too much negative emotion? – and any number other tenuous and unproven perceived causes. Aside from tobacco related cancers and cancers of the elderly, she explains there is very little rhyme or reason to why we get cancer which fuels our fear, guilt, and obsessions around the disease. She also calls out the cancer as war metaphor – we fight cancer, we attack tumours. The problem with the cancer as war metaphor is what happens if cancer kills you? Did you not fight hard enough? She explains that in the current rhetorical climate around cancer (I’m quoting from the book here) that “The cancer-is-war metaphor does not seem to allow space for the idea that in actual war, some soldiers die … no matter which side wins… The dead are responsible not just for getting cancer, but also for failing to defeat it.” Mitchell argues that we need to rewrite the cancer metaphor and look at it with a new clarity that takes away some of the irrationality that affects the emotional stress, guilt, and decision making when faced with a cancer diagnosis. Malignant Metaphor uses Mitchell’s brother-in-law’s cancer diagnosis as a jumping off point, and his story will be useful for those dealing with their own cancer diagnosis, but I found her analysis of the language we use, and how the metaphors we use to describe something can also fundamentally affect how we react to it. Think about if we were to shift from using war metaphors when we debate to using dancing metaphors – wouldn’t we have much more constructive disagreements?

Anyone can participate in Haliburton County Public Library’s Online Book Club by choosing to read one or more of four books selected each month. You don’t even have to read from a particular month’s selection you can just go online and make comments about books and reading in general. Just go to haliburtonlibrary.ca and click on the “g” for Goodreads. January’s theme is Novellas.

That’s it for this week’s Library Moments. Thanks for letting us share some of our favourite books of 2016 with you, and we look forward to sharing more in 2017. Thanks for listening here on 100.9 CANOE FM.

*Originally aired on 100.9 CANOE FM.

Library Moments: November Online Book Club

HL_gillerSherrill Sherwood, Collections Development: Hello, I’m Sherrill Sherwood from the Haliburton County Public Library and this is Library Moments. Once a week some of us from the library will come and talk about books, upcoming events, or the services we offer at the library.

The Giller Prize was founded in 1994 by Jack Rabinovitch in honour of his late wife, literary journalist Doris Giller. The award recognizes excellence in Canadian fiction – long format or short stories.The prize is the biggest purse for literature in Canada and has so far endowed more than three-quarters of a million dollars to Canadian writers.

Our November online book club theme is the Giller short list and features 13 Ways Of Looking At A Fat Girl by Mona Awad, The Wonder by Emma Donoghue, Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien, Yiddish For Pirates by Gary Barwin, The Party Wall by Catherine Leroux and The Best Kind Of People by Zoe Whittall.

Today Erin Kernohan-Berning and I will each talk about one of the titles listed.

the-party-wallErin Kernohan-Berning, Branch Services Librarian: With the nomination of The Party Wall, Montreal author Catherine Leroux shares the spotlight with translator Lazer Lederhendler. In the words of the Giller Prize jury, The Party Wall is “Intriguing, wise and strange, the novel reveals layers of love and tension that hold mystery yet keep a crystalline clarity. Leroux’s prose, beautifully translated by Lazer Lederhendler, never abandons aesthetic precision. Her story is always assured, yet remains open. Its architecture holds a centre pulsing with life.”

The Party Wall is a story about siblings joined in surprising ways. A twin absorbed in the womb, a sister saving the life of another, a husband and wife – both adopted – finding their world shaken by realizations of each other’s parentage, and a brother and sister searching for an estranged parent while the other parent lay dying. Leroux explores the relationships and revelations that strain those relationships between those closest to us. The fact that it is a translation makes it an intriguing Giller pick, highlighting the literary skills of both the author and the translator tasked with bringing her story to life to an English speaking audience.

the-best-kind-of-peopleSherrill Sherwood, Collections Development: What if someone you trusted was accused of the unthinkable? George Woodbury, a good natured teacher and dearly loved husband and father, is arrested for sexual misconduct at a prestigious prep school. His wife, Joan, vaults between denial and rage as the community she loved turns on her. Their daughter, Sadie, a popular over-achieving high school senior, becomes a social outcast. Their son, Andrew, assists in his father’s defense, while wrestling with his own unhappy memories of his teen years. A local author tries to exploit their story, while an unlikely men’s rights activist attempts to get Sadie onside their cause. With George locked up, how do the members of his family pick up the pieces and keep living their lives? How do they defend someone they love while wrestling with the possibility of his guilt? In The Best Kind Of People award-winning author Zoe Whittall explores issues of loyalty, truth, and the meaning of happiness through the lens of an all-American family on the brink of collapse.

In case you haven’t heard, the Giller prize winner for 2016 is Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien. HCPL’s online book club is pretty informal. You can choose to read one of the month’s selected titles, or simply comment on what you are reading. The theme is just a guide to get the book discussion juices flowing. So if you have always wanted to join a book club but don’t want to leave home to do that, it’s the perfect solution. You can get there by looking for the social media link on the library’s homepage, click “g” for Goodreads and it will take you right there. No winter driving involved. Thanks for listening to Library Moments here on 100.9 Canoe FM.

*Originally aired on 100.9 CANOE FM, November 27-December 3, 2016.

Library Moments: September Online Book Club

apple-256263_1920Sherrill Sherwood, Collections Development: Hello, I’m Sherrill Sherwood from the Haliburton County Public Library and this is Library Moments. Once a week some of us from the library will come and talk about books, upcoming events, or the services we offer at the library.

Labour Day and “back to school” all happen for us in September. This month’s theme is “Teachers” as it combines both a profession and going back to school. All four books selected this month have the word “teacher” in their title. There is a book of nonfiction, two works of literary fiction, and a self published romance complete with typos and word repetitions.

Today on Library Moments Bessie Sullivan and I will each talk about a novel featured in our online book club.

teachers-billionaireBessie Sullivan, County Librarian: For this month’s online book club, I read The Teacher’s Billionaire, a self-published romance.  I generally like romances and in this book I felt both the characters and the plot line were decent.  What was jarring and completely undermined my enjoyment of the book was that it hadn’t been edited.  There were grammar and spelling errors, typos and annoying word repetitions.  I learned a lot from this experience.  While I might not be reading a romance novel for the artistry of the writing, I do want it to be at least error free.  One of the most infuriating errors in the book was spelling the queen of the artful romance’s last name wrong.  Don’t refer to Jane Austen if you can’t be bothered to ensure proper spelling of her name.  There must have been some complaints about this lack of editing as I noticed that a new edited e-book version had been supplied on Amazon’s website.  We all read different books for different reasons, but reading for pleasure means we are doing it for the enjoyment of it.  When a book is produced purely because it will make the author money, that enjoyment is compromised. That said, I read the book through to the end because I cared enough about the characters to find out what happened to them.

teacher-manSherrill Sherwood, Collections Development: Teacher Man is Frank McCourt’s final memoir in the trilogy that started with Angela’s Ashes and continued in ‘Tis. Teacher Man focuses almost exclusively on McCourt’s 30-year teaching career in New York City’s public high schools, which began at McKee Vocational and Technical in 1958. His first day in class, a fight broke out and a sandwich was hurled in anger. McCourt immediately picked it up and ate it. On the second day of class, McCourt’s response about the Irish and their sheep brought the wrath of the principal down on him. All McCourt wanted to do was teach, which wasn’t easy in the jumbled bureaucracy of the New York City school system. Pretty soon he realized the system wasn’t run by teachers but by sterile officials. McCourt says “I was uncomfortable with the bureaucrats, the higher-ups, who had escaped classrooms only to turn and bother the occupants of those classrooms, teachers and students. I never wanted to fill out their forms, follow their guidelines, administer their examinations, tolerate their snooping, adjust myself to their programs and courses of study.” As McCourt matured in his job, he found ingenious ways to motivate the kids like having them write “excuse notes” from Adam and Eve to God, using parts of a pen to define parts of a sentence and using cookbook recipes to get the students to think creatively. McCourt throws down the gauntlet on education, asserting that teaching is more than achieving high test scores. It’s about educating, about forming intellects, about getting people to think. I personally love the quote “The best teachers are those who show you where to look but don’t tell you what to see”.

Anyone can participate in Haliburton County Public Library’s Online Book Club by choosing to read one or more of four books selected each month. You don’t even have to read from a particular month’s selection you can just go online and make comments about books and reading in general. October’s theme will be Spooky Titles.

To join the online book club, look for the Social Media links on our homepage at www.haliburtonlibrary.ca. Click on the “g” for Goodreads and it’ll take you right to the Online Book Club page. That’s it for this week’s Library Moments, thanks for listening here on 100.9 Canoe FM.

*Originally aired on 100.9 CANOE FM, September 23-29, 2016.

Library Moments: August Online Book Club

international youth dayErin Kernohan-Berning, Branch Services Librarian: Hello, I’m Erin Kernohan-Berning from the Haliburton County Public Library and this is Library Moments. Once a week some of us from the library will come and talk about books, upcoming events, or the services we offer at the library.

August 12th was designated International Youth Day by the UN as a day to focus on issues affecting youth around the world. This month for our online book club we have selected four young adult novels that portray different youth experiences. We have a book about indigenous Alaskans subjected to forced assimilation in a Catholic boarding school, a book about a boy growing up in a small town and struggling with his sexual identity, a girl who after growing up in a western culture is thrust into a forced marriage in Pakistan, and twins – one neurotypical and one with autism – struggling with their impending separation as they move on to new phases in their lives.

Today on Library Moments Bessie Sullivan and I will each talk about a novel featured in our online book club.

are you seeing meBessie Sullivan, County Librarian: In Are you seeing me? By Darren Groth, twins Justine and Perry are about to embark on the road trip of a lifetime in the Pacific Northwest. It’s been a year since they watched their dad lose his battle with cancer. Now, at only nineteen, Justine is the sole care giver for her disabled brother. But with Perry having been accepted into an assisted-living residence, their reliance on each other is set to shift. Before they go their separate ways, they’re seeking to create the perfect memory.

For Perry, the trip is a glorious celebration of his favourite things: mythical sea monsters, Jackie Chan movies and the study of earthquakes. For Justine, it’s a chance to reconcile the decision to ‘free’ her twin, to see who she is without her boyfriend, Marc – and to offer their mother the chance to atone for past wrongs. Written in alternating sections from each twin’s perspective, the book gives insight about what it’s like to live with a person who has what Justine calls a “brain condition,” or what it’s like to be that person yourself.  Justine is too young to have been thrust into the position of full-time caregiver and the book grapples with not only her deep love for the brother she cares for but also resentment towards the mother who abandoned them both when they were four years old.  Young Adult fiction can take on some pretty hard hitting issues that young people are facing, this was a great example of a sensitively thought out story that will help any reader develop empathy.

secrets of the henna girlErin: In Secrets of the Henna Girl by Sufiya Ahmed, Zeba Khan has grown up in the UK and is just like any other British teenager – waiting for her exam marks, and anticipating going to university. When her parents decide to take her on a vacation to their hometown in Pakistan, Zeba has no idea the trouble she will be thrown into. While there, her uncle holds her father to a promise to protect his son Asif who is in the military. With unrest in the country, the only way to get Asif out of the military is to have him marry a Zeba and send him off to Britain. But Zeba rejects this, and soon becomes a pawn in the family’s politics, with saving her father’s honour now more important than her own self-determination. She ultimately finds herself subjected to the prospect of a forced marriage and few allies to save her.

Sufiya Ahmed has worked as a researcher in the British government, and stories of other forced marriages inspired her to write Secrets of the Henna Girl. A distinction she makes clear in the book is the difference between arranged marriages – where two potential spouses are introduced to one another but ultimately both have to agree to the marriage; and forced marriages – where one is forced – often through physical and emotional abuse – into a marriage unwillingly, an outdated and largely illegal practice. The problem of forced marriage is prevalent enough that there are organizations and government resources devoted to rescuing people from forced marriages – which can happen in every culture. Secrets of the Henna Girl has been lauded as a good introduction to those unfamiliar with this practice which still occurs around the world.

Anyone can participate in Haliburton County Public Library’s Online Book Club by choosing to read one or more of four books selected each month. You don’t even have to read from a particular month’s selection you can just go online and make comments about books and reading in general. September’s theme will be Teachers.

To join the online book club, look for the Social Media links on our homepage at www.haliburtonlibrary.ca. Click on the “g” for Goodreads and it’ll take you right to the Online Book Club page. That’s it for this week’s Library Moments thanks for listening here on 100.9 Canoe FM.

*Originally aired on 100.9 CANOE FM August 28th – September 3rd, 2016.